5 WAYS TO GO GREEN WITH YOUR WASHING

Going green with your laundry routine is an easy and inexpensive way to step towards a low-waste lifestyle. Tweaking your laundry habits even slightly can have a big impact on your carbon footprint, and keep your wardrobe favourites looking better for longer. Here are five simple ways to protect your clothes and our precious planet, week by week.

A image of wooden pegs

GO NATURAL WITH ECO-FRIENDLY DETERGENTS. Conventional detergents contain toxic chemicals (mostly derived from petroleum) that can irritate human skin and be extremely harmful to the environment, containing ingredients that can cause algal blooms and disrupt marine ecosystems. Using tablets and capsules means you’ll use the correct dose every time, thus avoiding unnecessary waste and expense, and there’s less risk of the dose disappearing down the drain as they dissolve slowly in the machine. Liquids and gels dissolve more quickly but tend to be bleach free, meaning they’re kinder to clothes (though you might need to rinse out your machine every now and again). Whatever you choose, it’s never been easier to wash well.

AVOID HALF-LOADS and only run a wash when your machine is full. It's not rocket science: your washer will use the same amount of water to clean a single piece of clothing as it will a full week's wardrobe.

TRY COOLER WASHES. Once thought of as the best way to get your clothes squeaky clean, doing a 'hot wash' is in fact energy hungry and expensive, plus you run the risk of accidental shrinkage. Turn your machine down to 20C and use a biological detergent that's designed to work in low temperatures, and rest happily in the knowledge that you're doing your bit for the environment and making your clothes last longer by protecting the fibre from heat damage.

A washing machine

5 WAYS TO GO GREEN WITH YOUR WASHING

Going green with your laundry routine is an easy and inexpensive way to step towards a low-waste lifestyle. Tweaking your laundry habits even slightly can have a big impact on your carbon footprint, and keep your wardrobe favourites looking better for longer. Here are five simple ways to protect your clothes and our precious planet, week by week. 

Going green with your laundry routine is an easy and inexpensive way to step towards a low-waste lifestyle. Tweaking your laundry habits even slightly can have a big impact on your carbon footprint, and keep your wardrobe favourites looking better for longer. Here are five simple ways to protect your clothes and our precious planet, week by week. 

GO NATURAL WITH ECO-FRIENDLY DETERGENTS. Conventional detergents contain toxic chemicals (mostly derived from petroleum) that can irritate human skin and be extremely harmful to the environment, containing ingredients that can cause algal blooms and disrupt marine ecosystems. Using tablets and capsules means you’ll use the correct dose every time, thus avoiding unnecessary waste and expense, and there’s less risk of the dose disappearing down the drain as they dissolve slowly in the machine. Liquids and gels dissolve more quickly but tend to be bleach free, meaning they’re kinder to clothes (though you might need to rinse out your machine every now and again). Whatever you choose, it’s never been easier to wash well.

GO NATURAL WITH ECO-FRIENDLY DETERGENTS. Conventional detergents contain toxic chemicals (mostly derived from petroleum) that can irritate human skin and be extremely harmful to the environment, containing ingredients that can cause algal blooms and disrupt marine ecosystems. Using tablets and capsules means you’ll use the correct dose every time, thus avoiding unnecessary waste and expense, and there’s less risk of the dose disappearing down the drain as they dissolve slowly in the machine. Liquids and gels dissolve more quickly but tend to be bleach free, meaning they’re kinder to clothes (though you might need to rinse out your machine every now and again). Whatever you choose, it’s never been easier to wash well.

AVOID HALF-LOADS and only run a wash when your machine is full. It's not rocket science: your washer will use the same amount of water to clean a single piece of clothing as it will a full week's wardrobe.

AVOID HALF-LOADS and only run a wash when your machine is full. It's not rocket science: your washer will use the same amount of water to clean a single piece of clothing as it will a full week's wardrobe.

A washing machine

TRY COOLER WASHES. Once thought of as the best way to get your clothes squeaky clean, doing a 'hot wash' is in fact energy hungry and expensive, plus you run the risk of accidental shrinkage. Turn your machine down to 20C and use a biological detergent that's designed to work in low temperatures, and rest happily in the knowledge that you're doing your bit for the environment and making your clothes last longer by protecting the fibre from heat damage.

TRY COOLER WASHES. Once thought of as the best way to get your clothes squeaky clean, doing a 'hot wash' is in fact energy hungry and expensive, plus you run the risk of accidental shrinkage. Turn your machine down to 20C and use a biological detergent that's designed to work in low temperatures, and rest happily in the knowledge that you're doing your bit for the environment and making your clothes last longer by protecting the fibre from heat damage

RUN SHORTER CYCLES TO SAVE WATER. An hour-long wash is pleny for worn clothes and puts the fibres under less strain than a longer cycle, reducing long-term wear and tear. Heating and re-heating the water can account for up to 90% of the energy needed to run a single machine cycle, so cutting the duration is sensible, simple, eco-conscious choice to make.

RUN SHORTER CYCLES TO SAVE WATER. An hour-long wash is pleny for worn clothes and puts the fibres under less strain than a longer cycle, reducing long-term wear and tear. Heating and re-heating the water can account for up to 90% of the energy needed to run a single machine cycle, so cutting the duration is sensible, simple, eco-conscious choice to make.

GIVE THE TUMBLE DRYER A MISS and opt fo air drying wherever possible. A washing wire or a retractable washing line strung between trees in the garden (or even on a small balcony) will do just the job, if the weather is fair. If you don't have a garden or the forecast is frightful, set up a clothes rack inside and dry you clothes with - you guessed it - zero energy consumption.

GIVE THE TUMBLE DRYER A MISS and opt fo air drying wherever possible. A washing wire or a retractable washing line strung between trees in the garden (or even on a small balcony) will do just the job, if the weather is fair. If you don't have a garden or the forecast is frightful, set up a clothes rack inside and dry you clothes with - you guessed it - zero energy consumption.

RUN SHORTER CYCLES TO SAVE WATER. An hour-long wash is pleny for worn clothes and puts the fibres under less strain than a longer cycle, reducing long-term wear and tear. Heating and re-heating the water can account for up to 90% of the energy needed to run a single machine cycle, so cutting the duration is sensible, simple, eco-conscious choice to make.

Linen sheets hanging on a washing line

GIVE THE TUMBLE DRYER A MISS and opt fo air drying wherever possible. A washing wire or a retractable washing line strung between trees in the garden (or even on a small balcony) will do just the job, if the weather is fair. If you don't have a garden or the forecast is frightful, set up a clothes rack inside and dry you clothes with - you guessed it - zero energy consumption.